Final Program (updated 29 July 2019)

 

Program overview

 

 

Sunday, 7 July 2019

 

 

 

 

14:00-15:00

Registration &
Submit PowerPoints & Slides

D0 Hall

 

 

 

15:00-17:00

Workshop

Meth

E0.06

     

18:00-20:00

Registration & PPT submission

 

 

 

 

19:00-19:30

Opening session

D0.03

 

 

 

19:30-21:00

Get-Together-Party

D0 Hall

     

 

Monday, 8 July 2019

 

 

 

 

9:00-9:30

Registration & Coffee &
Submit PowerPoints & Slides

D0 Hall

     

9:30-10:20

Keynote 1: Filip De Fruyt

Pers

D0.03

     

10:30-12:00

Session 1

1-Org

E0.05

2-Intell

E0.06

3-Meth

D0.08

4-Clin

D2.13

12:00-13:00

Lunch

Restaurant

     

13:00-13:50

Keynote 2: Alberto Maydeu-
Olivares

Meth

D0.03

     

14:00-15:00

Fons van de Vijver symposium

Cult

D0.03

 

 

 

15:00-16:00

Poster session

D0 Hall

     

15:30-16:00

Registration & Coffee

D0 Hall

     

16:00-17:30

Session 2

1-Educ

D0.08

2-Intell

E0.05

3-Meth

D2.13

4-Pers

E0.06

17:30-19:30

Executive Committee

D2.13

 

 

 

 

Peter Theuns (Editor), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium, June 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, 9 July 2019

 

 

 

 

9:00-9:30

Registration & Coffee &
Submit PowerPoints & Slides

D0 Hall

     

9:30-10:20

Keynote 3: Ricarda Steinmayr

Educ

D0.03

     

10:30-12:00

Session 3

1-Clin

D0.08

2-Intell

E0.05

3-Meth

D2.13

4-Pers

E0.06

12:00-13:00

Lunch

Restaurant

     

13:00-13:50

Keynote 4: Roberto Colom

Intell

D0.03

     

14:00-15:30

Symposia 1

1-Pers

D0.08

2-Clin

E0.05

3-Pers

E0.06

4a-Meth

D2.13

15:30-16:00

Registration & Coffee

D0 Hall

     

16:00-17:30

Session 4

1-Educ

D0.08

2-Org

E0.05

3-Meth

D2.13

4-Pers

E0.06

17:30-19:00

Assembly meeting

D2.13

 

 

 

19:30-22:00

Conference dinner

       

 

Wednesday, 10 July 2019

 

 

 

 

9:00-9:30

Registration & Coffee &
Submit PowerPoints & Slides

D0 Hall

     

9:30-10:20

Keynote 5: Jennifer L. Tackett

Clin

D0.03

     

10:30-12:00

Session 5

1-Educ

D0.08

2-Org

E0.05

 

4-Pers

D2.13

12:00-13:00

Lunch

Restaurant

     

13:00-14:20

Symposia 2

1-Meth

D0.08

2-Clin

E0.05

3-Intell

E0.06

4b-Meth

D2.13

14:30-15:30

Plenary Conclusion

D0.03

     

 

 

 

Workshop

Workshop on Decision Tree Methods:
Sunday 7 July, 15:00-17:00, Room E0.06 (Marjolein Fokkema)

Decision tree methods for psychological assessment: An introduction to classification and regression trees, model-based trees, and trees for longitudinal and multilevel data

Marjolein Fokkema (Universiteit Leiden, The Netherlands)

 

Marjolein Fokkema is an expert in machine learning and statistics, as well as psychological assessment. In 2015 she obtained her PhD from the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, started working as an assistant professor in methods and statistics for psychology at Leiden University, and became an associate editor at the European Journal of Psychological Assessment. Her research focusses on recursive partitioning methods (RPMs), like for example classification and regression trees, random forests and boosted tree ensembles. Her central aim is developing RPMs that are easy to interpret and apply, and that can deal with multilevel and longitudinal data. She implemented RPMs in two popular packages (glmertree and pre) for the statistical programming environment R. She published papers on RPMs in journals like Behavior Research Methods, Psychological Assessment, Applied Psychological Measurement and the Journal of Statistical Software. Earlier, she taught workshops on RPMs at ETH Zurich, University of Zurich and University College London.

 

Summary

Recursive partitioning methods (RPMs), also known as decision tree methods, are statistical methods that provide results in the form of decision trees. A central advantage of decision trees is that they are easy to interpret and apply, even by non-statisticians. Furthermore, RPMs like classification and regression trees, random forests and boosted ensembles have gained much popularity in recent years, as they can deal with ‘big’ data, where the number of predictor variables exceeds the number of observations. This workshop provides an introduction to RPMs, and focusses on how psychological assessment and prediction problems can be addressed using RPMs. We start with a short introduction to RPMs, after which we will fit and interpret RPMs using the statistical program R. We will cover simple regression and classification problems, and from there extent to topics like longitudinal or multilevel data, variable selection bias, and detecting moderators.

 

Outline

The workshop aims to provide a gentle and practical introduction to RPMs. We will focus on a handful of data-analytic problems from psychological assessment. Datasets and R code will be provided, the latter in the form of a document in which code and results are combined with explanation, which will also be useful for future reference. An annotated reference list will be provided, which participants can use to guide further study on specific methods and algorithms. Some experience with R and with multiple linear and logistic regression models is advised. 

 

 

Keynote sessions and Abstracts

Keynote 1: Filip De Fruyt: Current Assessment Challenges in Personality.
Monday 8 July, 09:30-10:30, Room D0.03 (Chair: Laurence Claes)

Current Assessment Challenges in Personality

Filip De Fruyt (Universiteit Gent, Belgium)

 

Personality research as a domain made considerable progress the past decades, but personality constructs also received considerable attention in different other disciplines of psychology, including developmental, clinical, industrial and organizational, and more recently, also in educational psychology. Part of this enthusiasm was due to the fact that traits were considered as key constructs to understand very different phenotypic expressions of behavior, but also because traits are relatively easy to assess. These increasing applications bring additional challenges to the field to assess personality traits and their dynamics. I will review several of these challenges in my keynote presentation, referring to different applied fields in psychology and beyond.

 

Keynote 2: Alberto Maydeu-Olivares:Estimating causal effects in linear regression models with observational data: The Instrumental Variables Regression Model
Monday 8 July, 13:00-14:00, Room D0.03 (Chair: Jonny Fontaine)

Estimating causal effects in linear regression models with observational data: The Instrumental Variables Regression Model

Alberto Maydeu-Olivares (University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA)

 

Instrumental variable methods are an underutilized tool to enhance causal inference in Psychology. By way of incorporating predictors of the predictors (called “instruments” in the Econometrics literature) into the model, instrumental variable regression (IVR) is able to draw causal inferences of a predictor on an outcome. We show that by regressing the outcome yon the predictors xand the predictors on the instruments, and modeling correlated disturbance terms between the predictor and outcome, causal inferences can be drawn on yon xif the IVR model cannot be rejected in a structural equation (SEM) framework. We discuss how to identify instruments given a theoretical model, how to select the best subset of instruments when more than necessary are available, and we guide researchers on how to apply this model using SEM. We discuss Econometrics estimators to (e.g., two-stage least squares regression) from a SEM perspective, and we address the question of whether we should always use instrumental variable regression instead of ordinary regression.

 

Keynote 3: Ricarda Steinmayr: Predicting Academic Achievement: Challenges and Directions for Future Research.
Tuesday 9 July, 09:30-10:30, Room D0.03 (Chair: Peter Theuns)

Predicting Academic Achievement: Challenges and Directions for Future Research

Ricarda Steinmayr (Technische Universität Dortmund, Germany)

 

Students’ academic achievement has critical implications for their educational and career trajectories. Furthermore, achievement indicators are routinely used for selection purposes (e.g., college admissions and academic tracking), for evaluation purposes (e.g., assessment of educational effectiveness), and for analyses of achievement-related inequality across gender, ethnicity, and social class. Understanding what factors predict students’ academic achievement is therefore an important goal for educational and psychological research. Seminal reviews of available evidence (e.g. Hattie, 2009) identify a comprehensive list of such factors, including teacher-, family-, peer- and student-related aspects. The majority of research has concentrated on the relation between one factor and academic achievement. Thus, there is no scarcity of pertinent research. However, given the complexity of academic achievement, educational research must go beyond analyses of bivariate associations; a number of individual and contextual factors, as well as their interrelations must be taken into account in the prediction of achievement, as proposed in such influential theoretical models as Eccles and colleagues’ expectancy-value theory (Eccles & Wigfield, 2002), Walberg’s (1982) educational productivity model, and the model of students’ academic attainment developed for the Programme for International Student Assessment (Baumert et al., 2001). Furthermore, it is necessary to take a closer look at the operationalization of both academic achievement (e.g., grades, standardized academic achievement tests, level of education) and its proposed antecedents, because the prediction of achievement can vary greatly as a function of which indicators are used to capture intra- and interindividual differences in scholastic ability. Last but not least, potential moderators such as age, academic stage, and different academic domains must be considered in order to contribute to a better understanding of factors that potentially shape student achievement across different contexts. The keynote will focus on a multivariate approach to the prediction of academic achievement, on methodological challenges associated with the conceptualization and operationalization of achievement, and will outline a number of open questions regarding the prediction of academic achievement across different settings and populations.

 

Keynote 4: Roberto Colom: The assessment of intelligence in the XXI Century: Designing the future standing on the shoulders of giants.
Tuesday 9 July, 13:00-14:00 , Room D0.03 (Chair: Mark Schittkatte)

The assessment of intelligence in the XXI Century: Designing the future standing on the shoulders of giants

Roberto Colom (Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Spain)

 

Intelligence is the most reliable and valid social science variable. Millions of standardized intelligence tests are administered annually in a wide array of applied settings (educational admission and placement, job selection and design, as well as neuropsychological screening are examples). These applications are mainly derived from the classic psychometric approach. However, scientific research has accumulated sound and valuable knowledge regarding the genetic, brain, and cognitive factors related with the intelligence construct. This knowledge is still unfortunately divorced from the applied contexts in which psychologists display their practice. This lecture suggests how we can response to the challenge of translating basic research findings into the assessment of intelligence in the XXI Century. With this purpose in mind, I discuss four examples: (1) cognitive system design, (2) videogames, (3) artificial intelligence, and (4) neurometrics. As underscored by Earl B. Hunt (2011) “a great deal has been learned using the testing techniques that are ubiquitous today (…) but it is time to move on to new techniques of measurement if we want to obtain any major breakthrough (…) the biggest challenge will be to expand assessment on intelligence from observations within the conventional testing paradigm to observations of behavior in everyday life” (pp. 864, 882).

 

Reference

 

Hunt, E. B. (2011). Where are we? Where are we going? Reflections on the current and future state of research on intelligence. In R. J. Sternberg & S. Barry Kaufman, Eds., The Cambridge Handbook of Intelligence. Cambridge University Press, pp. 863-885.

 

Keynote 5: Jennifer L. Tackett: Thoughts on the Replication Crisis for Clinical Psychology
Wednesday 10 July, 09:30-10:30, Room D0.03 (Chair: Matthias Ziegler)

 

Thoughts on the Replication Crisis for Clinical Psychology

Jennifer L. Tackett (Northwestern University, IL, USA)

 

Methods and practices in psychological science have been the target of intense scrutiny over the last 6-7 years, partly in response to a series of replication failures and identification of problematic research practices in psychological research. Identification of problems and development of potential solutions has primarily emerged in the context of those psychological domains actively participating in this broader conversation, namely, social and cognitive psychology. In this presentation, I discuss potential reasons why clinical psychology has been absent from this debate and consequences of this absence—namely, delayed progress in identifying those areas of clinical research likely burdened by reproducibility problems and a gap in developing appropriate solutions for our research topics and practices. I will review some ongoing efforts related to preregistration, data sharing, and statistical and methodological practices that aim to move clinical psychological science toward more open, transparent, reproducible, and replicable research.

 

Symposia

Symposium – Fons Van de Vijver’s legacy: Challenges of assessment across countries and cultures
Monday 8 July, 14:00-15:00, Room D0.03(Organizer: Johnny Fontaine)

Challenges of assessment across countries and cultures

On June 1, Fons van de Vijver, former EAPA president, unexpectedly passed away at 66 in Maidenwell, Queensland, Australia. This symposium is set up to his honor.

 

Contributors: Johnny Fontaine, Ype H. Poortinga , Velicho Fetvadjiev, and Noémie Le Donné 

 

Assessment as a core feature of cross-cultural psychology

Ype H. Poortinga, Tilburg University, The Netherlands

 

Bias and equivalence: Psychometric approaches and beyond

Johnny R. J. Fontaine, Ghent University, Belgium

 

Cross-cultural assessment of personality: Development the South African Personality Inventory

Velichko Fetvadjiev, Victoria University, New Zealand

 

Challenges to comparability in OECD large-scale surveys in education

Noémie Le Donné, OECD, France

Symposium 1.1: The Alternative Model of Personality Disorders in the Spotlight. Tuesday 9 July, 14:00-15:30, Room D0.08 (Organizer: Laurence Claes)

The Alternative Model of Personality Disorders in the Spotlight

 

Laurence Claes, PhD, clinical psychologist and behavioral therapist, is full professor at the KU Leuven, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, and at the University of Antwerp, Faculty of Medicine and Mental Health.  Her teaching focuses on psychopathology, clinical assessment and interventions; her research focuses on the associations between personality (disorders) and psychopathology (non-suicidal self-injury, eating disorders, and pathological buying).

 

Summary

In the Alternative Model of Personality Disorders, section III of DSM-5, two new criteria are introduced for the assessment of personality disorders (PDs). Criterion A involves impairments in self (identity/ self-direction) and interpersonal (empathy/intimacy) functioning. Criterion B is a constellation of pathological personality traits descriptive of the PDs. In the present symposium, we present four studies which focus on the assessment of criterion A and B, and their interplay in different samples. A. Bogaerts focuses on the assessment of Criterion A (identity) and PDs, and L. Claes on the assessment of Criterion B (PID-5) and PDs in adult community and clinical samples. T. Bastiaens explores the interplay between Criterion A and B in an adult community sample. And finally, E. Pauwels investigates the association between personality schemata and criteria A/B of PDs in a clinical sample. Strengths and weaknesses of the assessment of the AMPD will be discussed.

 

Contributed papers:

Annabel Bogaerts, The association between identity (criterion A) and PDs in adult community and clinical samples.

Laurence Claes, The association between criterion B (PID-5) and PDs in adult community and clinical samples.

Tim Bastiaens, The interplay between criterion A and B of the AMPD in an adult community sample.

Els Pauwels, The association between personality schemata and criterion A/B of PDs in a clinical sample.

Symposium 1.2: New instruments, constructs and challenges in the children´s psychological assessment
Tuesday 9 July, 14:00-15:30, Room E0.05  (Organizer: Miguel Ángel Carrasco)

New instruments, constructs and challenges in the children´s psychological assessment

 

Miguel A. Carrasco is a professor of clinical psychological assessment in the Faculty of Psychology at the National University of Distance Education (UNED) in Madrid, Spain. He is also coordinator of the Clinical Psychological Center at that University.  In addition, he is member of both the International Society for Interpersonal Acceptance and Rejection and the European Association of Psychological Assessment. His research interests focus on parenting behavior, children’s psychological problems (mainly aggression and depression), and clinical assessment, especially in children and adolescents. To get more information about his research background, please go to his website.

 

Summary

The psychological assessment of Children and adolescents has become to a specialized subject that requires new challenges and the development of particular instruments, tools and constructs in order to improve the reliability and accuracy of the assessment in this population.  This symposium will deal with different issues regarding children´s psychological assessment in the field of clinical and health psychology: adaptation of new instruments (i.e., Children and Adolescent Assessment System, screening tool to evaluate the adolescents´  self-harm and suicide) and the study of its psychometric properties, the assessment of parents-children discrepancy patterns to predict children´s psychological adjustment, and how  emotional instability, coping and emotional self-efficacy are related to adolescents´ depression.  Participants from different universities of Europe will be part of this symposium and they will show their new research data and will take us to discuss and reflex about new results and challenges of the children and adolescents´ psychological assessment.

 

Contributed papers:

1) Carrasco, M.A., Izquierdo-Sotorrío, E,. & Holgado-Tello, F.P. “ Can we predict children’s adjustment from parents-children discrepancy patterns? “

 

2) Wrocławska-Warchala, E., & Joanna Niedziela, MA.  “ Spanish tool in Polish cultural context Polish adaptation of Children and Adolescent Assessment System SENA Psychometric properties of the tool”

 

3) José Antonio Piqueras, Juan Carlos Marzo-Campos, Raquel Falcó-García, Beatriz Moreno-Amador, Francisco Mira-López, Victoria Soto-Sanz, Tíscar Rodríguez-Jiménez, Agustín E. Martínez-González, María Rivera-Riquelme, Maria A. Ramos, Diego Macià, Corey Keyes, Pim Cuijpers, Erin Dowdy and Michael Furlong. “Screening of self-harm and suicide in a large sample of Spanish adolescents: preliminary results.

 

4) Malonda, E., Llorca, A., Samper, P., & Mestre, M. V. “Emotional instability and depressive symptomatology in adolescents: its relationship with coping and emotional self-efficacy”.

 

5) Delgado, B.; Holgado, F.P. &, Carrasco, M.A.  Assessment of Parental Acceptance,  Interpersonal Power and Prestige and Children’s Psychological Adjustment

 

Symposium 1.3: Alternative Ways to Assess Personality Characteristics:
Tuesday 9 July, 14:00-15:30, Room E0.06 (Organizers: Kai T. Horstmann & Clemens Stachl)

Alternative Ways to Assess Personality Characteristics

Kai T. Horstmann1& Clemens Stachl2

 

1Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany

1Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Department of Psychology, Psychological Methods and Assessment

 

 

Kai T. Horstmann is a post-doctoral researcher in the workgroup of Prof. Dr. Matthias Ziegler at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany, where he also obtained his Ph.D. in psychology. His research focuses on the assessment and prediction of behavior in daily life, the relation of personality states and personality traits, and the description and assessment of situational characteristics.

 

Summary

New technological advancements provide alternative ways to assess personality characteristics.

Especially the wide availability of smartphones and their daily use provides a new window into a person’s everyday behavior and experience. The current symposium showcases different approaches to the assessment of personality characteristics using information gathered with or from smartphones. In the first talk, Sust and colleagues showcase how personality characteristics can be inferred from music consumption. Horstmann and Ziegler then present recommendations for the construction of personality state measures. Finally, Roemer and colleagues present results from an experience sampling study for the assessment of intra-individual differences in vocational interests, using a planned missingness design. Combined, this symposium highlights the new possibilities and challenges that personality psychologist encounter when using smartphones for the assessment of personality characteristics.

 

Contributed papers:

 

Inferring personality traits from natural music listening on smartphones (Larissa Sust, Theresa Ullmann, Daniel Buschek, Markus Bühner & Clemens Stachl)

 

What to Consider when Constructing State Measures  (Kai T. Horstmann & M. Ziegler)

 

Holland at State-Level: Intraindividual Variability of Vocational Interests (Lena Roemer, Kai T. Horstmann, Matthias Ziegler)

 

 

Symposium 1.4a: Lies, damned lies, and response styles (Part A):
Tuesday 9 July, 14:00-15:30, Room D2.13 (Organizer: Matthias Ziegler)

Lies, damned lies, and response styles (Part A)

 

Matthias Ziegler is a professor for psychological assessment at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin. His research focuses on the assessment of personality and intelligence, their interplay in predicting performance and learning, and faking. He has authored more than 100 scientific papers. He has served the association as editor in chief of the European Journal of Psychological Assessment from 2013 until 2016.

 

Summary

Psychological research relies on people self-reporting about traits, states, feelings, and behavior. While this has undoubtedly been successful, an uneasy feeling remains when response biases are considered. This irritation not only plagues researchers but also practitioners. This two-parted symposium aims at providing insights into theoretical developments as well as potential solutions to the problem. Ziegler, Buck, and Paulhus report three studies focusing on the situation dependence of social desirable responding (SDR). Using correlative and experimental approaches the authors demonstrate that SDR should not be considered as a unidimensional construct. The idea of identifying predictors of faking is also pursued by Duerr who differentiates faking motivation from ability. Using data from a mock selection, both aspects are related to stages of the faking process. Brown details a new methodological approach to identifying faking using mixture modeling. In a mixed-method-approach the theoretical notions are empirically underpinned.

 

Contributed papers:

Social Desirable Responding – A tale of how many cities exactly?

Matthias Ziegler, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany, zieglema@hu-berlin.de

Lilly Buck, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany

Delroy Paulhus, University of British Columbia

 

Faking ≠ Successful Faking: Distinguishing Motivation to Fake from Ability to Fake

Daniel Duerr, Giessen University, Daniel.Duerr@psychol.uni-giessen.de

 

Modelling faking behaviour in high-stakes personality assessments:

A pragmatic approach

Anna Brown, University of Kent, United Kingdom, A.A.Brown@kent.ac.uk

 

Symposium 2.1: From web-based assessment to virtual reality: New technologies applied to increase psychological assessment ecological validity:
Wednesday 10 July, 13:00-14:30, Room D0.08 (Organizer: Víctor J. Rubio)

From web-based assessment to virtual reality: New technologies applied to increase psychological assessment ecological validity

 

Victor Rubio, PhD, CCP, associate professor in the Department of Biological and Health Psychology at the University Autonoma Madrid (Spain), has an extended experience in the field of psychological assessment and has been actively involved in the European Association of Psychological Assessment since its foundation.

 

Dr. Rubio’s current research interests are focused on health and sport psychology. Particularly, he is keen on analyzing psychological variables that might make athletes more vulnerable to injury (e.g., stress responses, risk-taking behaviors), as well as those which can affect the rehabilitation process.

 

Víctor Rubio is particularly interested in the introduction of new approaches, such as ecological momentary assessment, and technologies, such as mobile devices, in psychological assessment in order to increase accuracy, reduce missing values and decrease examinee active participation in gathering data.

 

 

Summary

New technologies have led to innovative developments and possibilities virtually unthinkable few decades ago that represent a remarkable contribution to some of the challenges psychological assessment has to face. This symposium presents some examples.

Piqueras et al. show a new web-based adolescents’ mental health assessment system which assists to identify mental health problems but also individuals’ strengths in educational settings.

Brondino et al. focus on the utility of different electronical devices to assess positive emotions related to natural environments exposure in a daily basis.

Rubio et al. presentation, also from an ecological assessment approach, presents the feasibility and utility of a mobile app designed to assess cognitive appraisals, emotions and behaviors associated to a severe sport injury during the rehab process.

Finally, Menardo et al. analyzes the usability of a virtual reality device to present face-valid stimuli in the assessment of positive and negative emotions associated to natural environments.

 

Presenters:

José Antonio Piqueras, Juan Carlos Marzo-Campos, Raquel Falcó-García, Beatriz Moreno-Amador, Francisco Mira-López, Victoria Soto-Sanz, Tíscar Rodríguez-Jiménez, Agustín E. Martínez-González, María Rivera-Riquelme, Maria A. Ramos, Diego Macià, Corey Keyes, Pim Cuijpers, Erin Dowdy & Michael Furlong: Web-based assessment and classification of complete mental health in Spanish adolescents: preliminary results.

 

Margherita Brondino, Daniela Raccanello, Roberto Burro, & Margherita Pasini: Positive emotions’ ecological assessment with multiple devices in a diary study

 

Víctor J. Rubio & Luis González-Barato: Psixport: a Mobile app for a daily assessment of psychological dimensions related to sport injury rehabilitation.

 

Elisa Menardo, Margherita Brondino, & Margherita Pasini: Influence of usability of Virtual Reality device on mood after exposure to natural virtual environment

 

Symposium 2.2: Embedding the assessment of emotions and emotional competence in the componential emotion approach:
Wednesday 10 July, 13:00-14:30, Room E0.05 (Organizer: Johnny Fontaine)

Embedding the assessment of emotions and emotional competence in the componential emotion approach

 

Johnny Fontaine made his PhD on the cross-cultural comparability of the Schwartz Value Survey at the KU Leuven in Belgium. He currently teaches psychological assessment and cross-cultural psychology at Ghent University in Belgium. He is the outgoing president of the European Association for Psychological Assessment. Ever since his PhD he has focused on the challenges of assessment in a cross-cultural context. His current research focuses on assessment of emotions and emotional intelligence.

 

Summary

For the assessment of emotions and emotional intelligence (EI), it is seldom made explicit what emotions are. However, a theoretical framework is important for evaluating the construct validity of assessment instruments. In this symposium four emotion/EI assessment studies are presented that embed assessment of emotions and EI in the componential emotion approach (CEA). The CEA defines an emotion as a process characterized by a dynamic interplay between cognitive, motivational, expressive, bodily, and subjective components in reaction to goal-relevant events. Within the CEA, EI can be defined as the ability to identify an emotion process based on information from one or more components, to understand the dynamic interplay between these components during an emotion process, and to know how to regulate the emotion process in order to maximally attain one’s goals. The CEA allows to identify which (aspect of) emotions or EI is assessed and how it/they can be best operationalized.

 

Contributed papers:

Céline Baele & Johnny R. J. Fontaine: A componential emotion approach to the assessment of Moral Distress

Sanja Budimir, Johnny R. J. Fontaine & Etienne Roesch: Assessing emotional experiences of cyberattack victims

Eva Sekwena & Johnny R. J. Fontaine: Emotional intelligence as a buffer to stressful police work

Arpine Hovasapian, Veerle Huyghe, Johnny R. J .Fontaine: Validation of the short Components of Emotion Understanding Test (CEUT)

 

Symposium 2.3: The art of assessing intelligence: Quality issues, test development and applications in Flanders:
Wednesday 10 July, 13:00-14:30, Room E0.06 (Organizer: Marlies Tierens)

The art of assessing intelligence: Quality issues, test development and applications in Flanders

 

Marlies Tierens, PhD, is the head of the Centre for Psychological Assessment and lecturer in psychological assessment at Thomas More Antwerp, Applied Psychology. Together with her colleagues, she’s working on the development of the CoVaT-CHC, a Dutch test for cognitive assessment based on the CHC model. She also gives lectures and workshops about the CHC model and how cognitive profiles can be translated into practical advice. She’s a member of the Psychodiagnostics Section of the Belgian Federation of Psychologists and the Flemish Diagnostics Forum (VFD, Vlaams Forum voor Diagnostiek).

 

Summary

In the assessment of intelligence, several issues need consideration to ensure qualitative test results. Today, tests on cognitive abilities are often, explicitly or implicitly, based on the Cattell – Horn – Carroll (CHC) taxonomy. This symposium provides more insight into the translation of theoretical guidelines of test development into practice. The first presentation highlights quality issues in test construction and the assessment of cognitive abilities. The second speaker illustrates some of these principles for the development of the CHC-based Dutch cognitive ability test. The third presentation discusses the importance of an objective instrument to identify talented pupils. Finally, the last presenter  addresses the development of decisions rules for interpreting cognitive profiles.

 

Contributed papers:

Quality issues (psychometrical and theoretical) in developing and adapting measures for assessment of cognitive abilities. (Mark Schittekatte, UGent)

How to applicate quality criteria in the development of a Dutch Cognitive Ability Test: an illustration. (Katrijn Van Parijs, Thomas More)

Student characteristics affecting the recognition of high cognitive ability. (Jeroen Lavrijsen, KU Leuven)

Translating cognitive profiles into advice: establishing principles for interpretation (Marlies Tierens, Thomas More)

 

Symposium 2.4b: Lies, damned lies, and response styles (Part B):
Wednesday 10 July, 13:00-14:30, Room D2.13 (Organizer: Matthias Ziegler)

Lies, damned lies, and response styles (Part B)

 

Matthias Ziegler is a professor for psychological assessment at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin. His research focuses on the assessment of personality and intelligence, their interplay in predicting performance and learning, and faking. He has authored more than 100 scientific papers. He has served the association as editor in chief of the European Journal of Psychological Assessment from 2013 until 2016.

 

Summary

In part B, the talk by Rouco and colleagues adds acquiescence to the symposium. Using US, Spanish, and German BFI-2 data, an acquiescence factor is compared. The results imply cultural differences in this response style. Bäckström and Björklund introduce one way of dealing with SDR and faking: Neutralized items. The authors here present first empirical evidence supporting the utility of the approach even in high stakes settings. In the final talk, Meijer, Niessen, and Neumann elaborate on the problems associated with combining information from questionnaires with other assessment methods in order to derive decisions. They specifically focus on the comparison of mechanical and expert-based decision making.

 

Contributed papers:

Acquiescence across cultural borders: An investigation using the BFI-2

Victor Rouco, Ghent University, victor.rouco@ugent.be

David Gallardo-Pujol, University Barcelona

Christopher Soto, Colby College

Oliver John, Berkeley University

 

Personality Self-ratings in High Stake Situations: The case of neutralized items

Prof. Dr. Martin Bäckström

Dr. Fredrik Björklund

Lund University, Sweden

 

How should we combine personality data with other information in individual decision-making: Some practical suggestions

Rob R. Meijer, University of Groningen, psychometrics and statistics, the Netherlands, r.r.meijer@rug.nl

  1. Susan M. Niessen, University of Groningen, psychometrics and statistics, the Netherlands

Marvin Neumann, University of Groningen, psychometrics and statistics, the Netherlands

 

 

 

Oral sessions

Session 1.1 Organisational:
Monday 8 July, 10:30-12:00, Room E0.05 (Chair: Nathalie Parent)

  • Individual Dealing with Social Heterogeneity – Diversity Competence and its Relation to Personality, Resources and Competences (Pietzonka, Manuel ; Kolb, Christoph J.)
  • Predictive validity of the Career Orientation Guide (GROP) with groups of workers (Parent, Nathalie; Bélanger, Marie-Pierre)
  • Revisiting the Internal Structure of the English Version of the Career Decision-Making Difficulties Questionnaire in Seven Countries (Levin, Nimrod ; Braunstein-Bercovitz, Hedva ; Lipshits-Braziler, Yuliya ; Gati, Itamar ; Rossier, Jérôme )
  • Orientations toward Higher Education Among Arab Young Adults in Israel: Measurement Invariance and Criterion Validity (Lipshits-Braziler, Yuliya; Kashkoush, Shada)

 

Session 1.2 Intelligence:
Monday 8 July, 10:30-12:00, Room E0.06 (Chair: Mark Schittekatte)

  • Should students be smart, curious, or both? Fluid intelligence, Openness, and interest co-shape the acquisition of reading and math competence (Lechner, Clemens; Miyamoto, Ai; Knopf, Thomas)
  • Construct validity of the French WISC-V: Analyses based on a clinical sample (Döll Salome ; Lecerf Thierry ; Peiffer Elsa ; Bovet-Boone Françoise ; Geistlich Sophie ,)
  • From Paper-And-Pencil to Computer-Based Testing: how the format influences test development (Joris, Steven; Van Parijs, Katrijn; Tierens, Marlies; Magez, Walter)
  • An investigation of the processes underlying the item-position effect observed in the assessment of reasoning (Schweizer, Karl; Reiß, Siegbert; Zeller, Florian)

 

Session 1.3 Methods:
Monday 8 July, 10:30-12:00, Room D0.08 (Chair: Victor Ortuño)

  • Data quality metrics and reliability of validation experiments for psychometric instruments (Chernov, Yury)
  • Testing a 15-item Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI) with Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling (ESEM) (Ortuño, Victor)
  • Multilevel Discrete-time Survival Analysis : Using Adolescents School Dropout Intention (Hyojin Kim; Sehee Hong)
  • Testing the adequacy of scales measuring compulsive buying behavior in terms of their applicability in the processes of classification of examined individuals (Tarka Piotr)
  • Fitting decision trees to multilevel and longitudinal data (Fokkema, Marjolein)

 

Session 1.4 Clinical & Health:
Monday 8 July, 10:30-12:00, Room D2.13 (Chair: Steven Degrauwe)

  • Risk Assessment in Forensic-Psychiatric Care from Indicators of Institutional Adaptation: The Relevance of Personality Pathology (Degrauwe, Steven ; De Clercq, Barbara )
  • Examining transactions between daily situations and borderline personality traits in early adulthood and the role of childhood experiences of parenting (Vanwoerden, Salome; Hofmans, Joeri; De Clercq, Barbara)
  • Study of the impact of non-pharmacological techniques (self-hypnosis/self-care) on cognitive complaints in cancer patients (Bicego, Aminata; Grégoire, Charlotte; Cassol, Helena; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth, Pr.; Nyssen, Anne-Sophie, Pr.; Rousseaux, Floriane; Guy, Jerusalem, Pr.; Laureys, Steven, Pr.; Bragard, Isabelle, PhD.; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey, PhD.)

 

Session 2.1 Educational:
Monday 8 July, 16:00-17:30, Room D0.08 (Chair: Beth Perkins)

  • Predicting Examinee Effort and Test Performance from Change in Emotions During a Test: A Latent Growth Model (Perkins, Beth, A; Finney, Sara, J; Satkus, Paulius)
  • The Russian adaptation of the Handelman’s Adolescent Apathy Inventory (Zolotareva, Alena)
  • Adaptation and Validity Evidence for Russian Version of Elementary School Motivation Scale (Parmaksiz ,Leonid; Kulikova ,Alena; Kanonire, Tatjana)
  • Boys´ loneliness at age 8 years predicts psychiatric symptoms at age 18 years (Junttila, Niina; Lempinen, Lotta; Sourander, Andre)

 

Session 2.2 Intelligence:
Monday 8 July, 16:00-17:30, Room E0.05 (Chair: George Spanoudis)

  • Speed of processing, control of processing, working memory and crystallized and fluid intelligence: Evidence for a Developmental Cascade (George Spanoudis; Anna Tourva)
  • The Effect of Game Based Cognitive Development Support Classroom Guidance Programme on Intelligence of Fourth Grade Primary School Students (Sezgin, Mehtap; Gündoğdu, Mehmet, H.)
  • Categorization and the cultural aspects thereof (Denglerova, Denisa)
  • You can play the game without rules – but you’re better with: The influence of rule knowledge in figural matrices tests (Levacher, Julie; Koch, Marco ; Spinath, Frank, M.; Becker, Nicolas)

 

Session 2.3 Methods:
Monday 8 July, 16:00-17:30, Room D2.13 (Chair: Julie De Ganck)

  • Dialogue and diagnostics: children’s lived experiences of a diagnostic process (De Ganck, Dorothee; De Ganck, Julie ; Boeckmans, Ivan)
  • Responding to negatively-worded items: the role of neuroticism, effortful control and attentional bias (Michaelides, Michalis, P. ; Koutsogiorgi, Chrystalla)
  • The large-scale assessment of social and emotional skills in secondary school context: case of Russia (Kulikova, Alena; Orel, Ekaterina)
  • Usefulness versus Complexity: Practical Implications of IRT Model Selection (Crișan, Daniela; Tendeiro, Jorge; Meijer, Rob)
  • Challenges in Longitudinal Multi-Stage Testing in Educational Large-Scale Assessments (Timo Gnambs; Claus H. Carstensen)

 

Session 2.4 Personality:
Monday 8 July, 16:00-17:30, Room E0.06 (Chair: John Magnus Roos)

  • Sex Differences in Personality are larger in Gender Equal Countries: Replicating a Surprising Finding with Mahalanobis Distances (Petri J. Kajonius, *; Erik Mac Giolla; John Magnus Roos)
  • Expert validity on non-verbal personality characters of the Big Five (Roos, John Magnus ; Persson, Björn ; Kajonius, Petri)
  • Comparable Measurement of Religiosity Across Different Religious Groups (Bluemke, Matthias; Groskurth, Katharina)
  • Mapping interests to the landscape of occupations in Germany (Sander, Nicolas ; Sengewald, Erik)

 

Session 3.1 Clinical:
Tuesday 9 July, 10:30-12:00, Room D0.08 (Chair: Imke Baetens)

  • Body experience in patients with mental disorders; results of self-report measures and their relevance for clinical practice (Scheffers, Mia ; Van Busschbach, Jooske T.; Van Duijn, Marijtje A. J. ; Schoevers, Robert. A.)
  • Culinary cultural identity as a protective factor for health in prevention of cardiovascular disease (Tabernero, Carmen ; Castillo Mayén, Rosario ; Gutierrez Domingo, Tamara ; Cuadrado, Esther ; Rubio, Sebastián ; Arenas, Alicia ; Luque, Bárbara)
  • A Functional Measurement Study On The Assessment Of Decision-Making Capacity In The Context Of Euthanasia (Theuns, Peter & De Wette, Céline)

 

Session 3.2 Intelligence:
Tuesday 9 July, 10:30-12:00, Room E0.05 (Chair: Marlies Tierens)

  • Which IQ test’s differentiate better Giftedness (Gallopeni, Florim. Goma Frixanet, Montserrat. Thaci,Jusuf. Hysenaj, Arben.)
  • Psychometric properties of Cattell‘s Fluid Intelligence Test (CFT 20-R) in Lithuanian sample of 8–15 year olds (Butkienė, Dovilė; Gintilienė, Gražina; Girdzijauskienė, Sigita; Nasvytienė, Dalia)
  • Situational effects in emotional reasoning assessment: A contribution to validity evidence on the two performance-based measures (Buško, Vesna; Babić Čikeš, Ana)
  • The one and only IQ (Tierens, Marlies ; Magez, Walter)
  • The incidental information processing as a factor of language aptitude (Gavrilova Evgeniya)

 

Session 3.3 Methods:
Tuesday 9 July, 10:30-12:00, Room D2.13 (Chair: René Proyer)

  • Diagnostic Evaluation of Autism Spectrum Disorders (De Ganck, Julie ; Schouppe, Nathalie)
  • Assessing Dispositions Towards Ridicule and Being Laughed at with the PhoPhiKat-45: A Comparison of the Rating-Scale and Expanded Answer Format-Version (Brauer, Kay; Proyer, René, T.)
  • Developmental Resources of Chinese Youths: A Chinese Adaption of the German Questionnaire “FRKJ” (Teuber, Ziwen; Wang, Qichen; Su, Yanjie; Lohaus, Arnold; Nussbeck, Fridtjof W.)
  • Bring your own device: Validity of intelligence tests conducted on own smartphones (Koch, Marco; Levacher, Julie; Spinath, Frank, M.; Becker, Nicolas)

 

Session 3.4 Personality:
Tuesday 9 July, 10:30-12:00, Room E0.06 (Chair: Scott R. Ross)

  • Differences in personality traits of selected/not selected applicants to Swedish Counter Terror Police Unit (Peter G Tedeholm; Anders Sjöberg; Agneta C Larsson)
  • Narcissistic Resilience? The Possible Role of Mediating Components in a Structural Equation Modeling Paradigm (Bandi, Szabolcs-; Marko, Eva-; Kiss, Eniko Csilla-; Nagy, Laszlo-)
  • Assessment of Openness to Change & Conservation values in Ukrainian, Polish and Romanian young adults(Romanyuk, Lyudmyla, V.)
  • Toward Shorter (and More Content-Valid) Measures of Character Strengths: Revising the IPIP-VIA Scales (Bluemke, Matthias ; Partsch, Melanie ; Lechner, Clemens ; Saucier, Gerard)
  • Development of the NEO-BFAS: Using Cross-validation in Initial Phases to Maximize Generalizability (Ross, Scott R. ; DeYoung, Colin G.)

 

Session 4.1 Intelligence:
Tuesday 9 July, 16:00-17:30, Room D0.08 (Chair: Bea Kreemers)

  • Insights from multimethod identification study of gifted and high ability students in Lithuania (Girdzijauskiene Sigita*; Gintiliene Grazina*;  Butkiene Dovile*;  Nasvytiene Dalia*;  Dragunevicius Kestutis*)
  • A study on Formative Assessment with Cognitive Diagnosis Model Application for Math Proficiency (Ayan, Cansu; Çıkrıkçı, Nükhet)
  • Creativity and Behavioral Characteristics of Gifted Underachievers in Primary School (Nasvytiene, Dalia; Girdzijauskiene, Sigita; Gintiliene, Grazina; Butkiene, Dovile; Dragunevicius, Kestutis)
  • The Adaptive Behavior Assessment System: Reliability, validity and norms for the Flemish general population (Kreemers, Bea; Maljaars, Jarymke;  Storms, Gert ; Maes Bea ; Noens, Ilse)
  • Interrelations between students’ affects, collaboration and achievement in a virtual science learning environment(Laakkonen Eero; Pietarinen Tarja; Vauras Marja; Kinnunen Riitta; Volet Simone)

 

Session 4.2 Organisational:
Tuesday 9 July, 16:00-17:30, Room E0.05 (Chair: Aristides Ferreira)

  • Biomarkers and hormones: Contributions to a fuller understanding of alternative measures to assess productivity despite presenteeism. (Ferreira, Aristides; Pérez-Nebra, Amalia R. ; Aguiar, Maria L. A. ; Costa, Eva E. ; Costa, Carla G. ; Zambonato, Adriane ; Modesto, João G.)
  • Gender Differences in Corruption Tolerance: Effect of Ambivalent Attitudes Toward Men (Kolachev Nikita)
  • A predictive criterion-related validation study of a short version of the Hazard Awareness Test (Burt, Christopher D B, and Hunt, Jason, Z)

 

Session 4.3 Methods:
Tuesday 9 July, 16:00-17:30, Room D2.13 (Chair: Yury Chernov)

  • Validation of computer-aided handwriting analysis and its integration into psychological assessment (Chernov, Yury)
  • Measuring personality similarity and its relationship to divorce (Lovik, Anikó; Nassiri, Vahid; Molenberghs, Geert; Verbeke, Geert)
  • Using eye-tracking as an implicit measure of prejudice (Esteves, Francisco ; Jansson, Billy; Zakrisson, Ingrid)
  • Using Generalizability Theory to estimate conditional standard error of measurement of HEXACO Personality Inventory (Gempp, René)

 

Session 4.4 Personality:
Tuesday 9 July, 16:00-17:30, Room E0.06 (Chair: Tim Bastiaens)

  • Portuguese version of the Spence Children’s Anxiety Scale, self- (SCAS) and parent-report (SCAS-P) (Alves, Diana *; Canário, Ana, C.*;  Barbosa, Ana C.*;  Gomes, Flávia S. *)
  • Exploring personality structure in South Africa using the NEO-PI-R: Does the FFM hold? (August, Justin; Laher, Sumaya; Takalani, James)
  • Identity as an area of dysfunction among all personality disorders (Bogaerts, Annabel; Luyckx, Koen; Bastiaens, Tim; Kaufman, Erin A.; Claes, Laurence)
  • Further validation of a situational judgement tool (SJT) for borderline personality pathology (Verbeke Lize; De Clercq Barbara)
  • Assessing Four Facets of Adult Playfulness with 12 Items: The OLIW-S (Brauer, Kay; Proyer, René, T.)

 

Session 5.1 Educational:
Wednesday 10 July, 10:30-12:00, Room D0.08 (Chair: Christoph Kolb)

  • Examining the Functioning of Test Emotion Items across Testing Platforms and Gender: A Measurement Invariance Study (Satkus, Paulius; Finney, Sara, J; Perkins, Beth, A)
  • Psychometric properties of Multisource Assessment of Children’s Social Competence and Bryant Empathy Index with Spanish schoolchildren (Rocío Luque-González; Olga Gómez-Ortiz; Rosario Ortega-Ruiz; Eva M. Romera)
  • Efficacy in teachers: psychometric properties and relation with emotional intelligence (Camacho, Antonio; Gómez-Ortiz, Olga; Ortega-Ruiz, Rosario; Romera, Eva M.)
  • The Rating Scale AdoDiko for the Measurement of Diversity Competence in Adolescents (Kolb, Christoph J.; Pietzonka, Manuel)
  • Analyses of acceptance of a multimethod Online Self-Assessment under the condition of mandatory participation for prospective students (Ortner, Tuulia, M.; Scherndl, Thomas; Leiner, Julia, E.M.)

 

Session 5.2 Organisational:
Wednesday 10 July, 10:30-12:00, Room E0.05 (Chair: Aristides Ferreira)

  • Leadership presenteeism engagement: Construction and psychometric evidence of a new instrument (Ferreira, Aristides I.; Lopes, Sara L.)
  • Non- Metric Personal Map: A new conceptual framework for life coaching. (Dr. Rimmer, Avigdor)
  • The Development of Workplace Friendship Scale (Sen-Kai, Yang; Cheng-Hsien, Li)
  • The Requirement-based Occupational Classification (ROC-2019) – Clusteranalytic construction and application (Münscher, Johann-Christoph; Bliem, Wolfgang)

 

Session 5.4 Personality:
Wednesday 10 July, 10:30-12:00, Room D2.13 (Chair: Miguel Angel Carrasco)

  • Measuring Empathy in Dark Personalities: There is the Ability but not the Disposition to Empathize (Kajonius, Petri J. ; Roos, Magnus J. ; Björkman, T.)
  • Children´s negative affect and effortful control on aggression: The role of mothers` reactions. (Holgado-Tello, F.P; Carrasco, M.A.; Delgado, B)
  • Comparing the psychometric quality of three short-scale measures assessing the Big Five (Rammstedt, Beatrice; Danner, Daniel;  Lechner, Clemens, M.)
  • On the structure of explicit motives: Bottom-up factor analysis of a motivational inventory (Kemper, C. J.; Lang, J. W. B.)

 

Posters

Poster Session, Monday 8 July, 15:00-16:00, Room D0-Hall

  • Gender differential item functioning in the Slovak version of Big Five Inventory 2 (Kohút, Michal; Halama, Peter)
  • The differences between self-reported and measured height and weight among adults with type 1 diabetes (Kkeli, Natalie; Merwin, Rhonda M.; Michaelides, Michalis, P.)
  • Atrial fibrillation treatment adherence and subjective correlates of the disease (Belova Sofya; Gavrilova Evgeniya; Ovsyannikova Victoria; Shepeleva Elena; Valueva Ekaterina)
  • Everyday hassles, adverse events and traumas: the role of children’ coping and mother’s mental health on elementary school-aged children adjustment. (Parent, Nathalie; Lemardelet, Laura)
  • The development and validation of the respecting-teachers scale in a Confucian cultural context (Chien, Chin-Lung ; Hsu, Shih-Chi ; Lin, Tzu-Hsiang ; Chen, Yi-Chao ; Huang, Shih-Chen ; Huang Chung-Ping ; Chen, Wei-Ying )
  • The level of anxiety and diagnostic attitudes of psychology students (Słysz, Anna; Stypińska, Małgorzata)
  • Flow as a Mediator in the Relationship between Passion and Visual Art Creativity of Primary School Students in Taiwan (Liu Pei Yun)
  • Early screening of mental disorders at school: usefulness of the Dominic Interactive with elementary school-aged children (Parent, Nathalie; Lemardelet, Laura)
  • Situational Judgment Tests in the assessment of emotional and social abilities (Valueva Ekaterina; Shepeleva Elena; Ovsyannikova Victoriya)
  • How dark is the future? The Dark Future Scale adaptation to Uruguay: Factor Structure & Psychometric Characteristics. (- Murnikovas, Alexas.; , – Ortuño, Victor.)
  • Online and social media recruitment: An exploratory study in Portugal (Correia, Anabela ; Martins, Sara)
  • Exploring gender differences on dangerous driving behavior: A meta-analysis (Sarbescu Paul; Rostescu Daniela Carina)
  • Meditation experience and trait-mindfulness are associated with reduced self-reported mind-wandering – German validation of the Daydreaming Frequency Scale (Linares Gutiérrez, Damisela; Pfeifer, Eric; Schmidt, Stefan; Wittmann, Marc)